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Girls’ self-confidence falls below that of boys from around age of six

but not if they go to a single-sex school, Australian study finds

2019-02-11
"We hope our research will empower caregivers and teachers to inspire confidence and purpose in young adults, especially when they are deciding on their subjects and careers, which can be as early as 13 years of age."

Girls’ self-confidence falls below that of boys from around age of six

but not if they go to a single-sex school, Australian study finds

Girls’ self-confidence falls below that of boys from around age of six

Evidence shows some girls start to believe they cannot as clever as boys from 6

Experts looked at data from 100,000 students aged 12 to 17 in single-sex schools

They found no significant difference in self-confidence between boys and girls

This suggests girls who are kept separate from the opposite sex may not start to believe they are inferior

Girls at risk of becoming less confident than boys may hold on to their self-esteem if they attend single-sex schools.

Evidence shows some girls start to believe they cannot be a clever or brilliant as boys from the age of six.

But a study has found girls who go to single-sex schools do not have this crisis of confidence.

Researchers looked at more than 100,000 students aged 12 to 17 in single-sex schools and found no significant difference between the self-confidence of boys and girls.

Girls at risk of becoming less confident than boys may hold on to their self-esteem if they attend single-sex schools. Evidence shows some girls start to believe they cannot be a clever or brilliant as boys from the age of six (stock image) +3

Girls at risk of becoming less confident than boys may hold on to their self-esteem if they attend single-sex schools. Evidence shows some girls start to believe they cannot be a clever or brilliant as boys from the age of six (stock image)

Numerous previous studies have found girls are less confident in their own abilities than boys, which has been blamed for the lack of women in science and technology careers.

But the latest results suggests girls who are kept separate from the opposite sex may not start to believe they are inferior.

 
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Quelle: Daily mail
"We hope our research will empower caregivers and teachers to inspire confidence and purpose in young adults, especially when they are deciding on their subjects and careers, which can be as early as 13 years of age."

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