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Gender equality in education

Issues surrounding "Gender equality in education" which single gender education can change

2013-10-22
 

Gender equality in education

Issues surrounding "Gender equality in education" which single gender education can change

Gender equality
The OECD sums up some issues surrounding "Gender equality in education" where single-sex education may be helping in different ways.

Did you know...

At 15 boys's average reading skills are a year behind girls'

Differences are even larger among the lowest performing students as many boys lack basic reading skills, while only a few girls are not able to read texts and comprehend what they read. On average, boys are better in Maths than girls, but this gender gap is much smaller than in reading. [Graph and data]



15 year-old girls are less likely than boys to expect a career in science, technology or engineering even when their school results in mathematics and science are equally good

Even among 15 year-old students who perform well in mathematics and science, girls and boys aspire to different occupations: girls who anticipate working in fields such as engineering and computing are few. [See OECD 2012]




On current trends there will be an average of 1.4 female students for every male in higher education by 2025

In the OECD the average share of female students in higher education was 46% in 1985 and  54% in 2005. If the trend continues, there will be an average of 1.4 female students for every male by 2025. [Table]




Women account for 75% of tertiary degrees awarded in health and welfare but only for 19% of those awarded in computer sciences

There remain large gender differences in choice of field of study. Although more women are completing degrees in STEM (science, technology, engineering, or mathematics) - particularly in biology and agriculture - they still account for a very small share of students in computing and engineering - subjects in great demand on the labour market in OECD countries and other region. [Graph and data]




Women who pursue scientific studies are less likely than men to end up working in physics, mathematics and engineering but much more likely to teach

Among university graduates who work as professionals or technicians, about 66% of the female graduates who studied humanities work as teachers, compared with about 53% of male graduates. By contrast, 71% of male graduates from the science field work as professionals in physics, mathematics and engineering, as opposed to 43% of female graduates. [Graph and data]



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Source: oecd
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